Once upon a premiere

Something reminded me recently that it was 20 years this year since I attended my one and only movie premiere – the IMAX movie “Everest” in 1998, screened in the IMAX theatre at the Trocadero Centre at Piccadilly Circus in London. It was the first ever IMAX movie about an expedition to climb Mount Everest, sponsored by fleece fabric manufacturers Polartec, and it subsequently went on to become the highest grossing IMAX documentary ever. As an outdoors writer specialising in reviews of clothing and equipment, I was well acquainted with Polartec, hence my invitation to the London premiere.

Filmed in Spring 1996, it tells the story of an attempt on Everest led by American climber Ed Viesturs. With him are Jamling Tenzing Norgay, son of the legendary Sherpa Tenzing, who made the first ascent of Everest with Ed Hillary in 1953, and Araceli Segarra – who became the first Spanish woman to climb the mountain. There’s added human drama when climbers and film crew are involved in the rescue efforts as storms rage across the mountain, claiming eight lives. Technically, the film is absolutely stunning, with six-channel digital sound to add to the frightening reality. The film’s soundtrack includes suitably grand music for the big vistas, but for me, it was definitely enhanced with the inclusion of clips of a number of George Harrison tracks.

IMAX movies are incredible for their sheer size on-screen, but while some go into overkill with the stomach-churning effects, “Everest” keeps them in check.¬†Even so, the sight of an advancing avalanche had me ducking off my seat, and some of the airborne shots have incredible depth, while the climbing scenes test your head for heights. You really do feel as though you’re there! 20 years on, it’s not quite the same viewing it as a DVD in your lounge, but it’s still pretty spectacular!

I ended up sitting through two premiere screenings of the 45 minute documentary, the first with the BBC’s Paul Gambaccini sitting directly in front of me, and there was a fascinating Q&A session with some of the people involved in the production. Filming high on Everest is challenging at any time, even more so with the specially-constructed IMAX large format camera, built to operate at temperatures as low as minus 40, but still not exactly lightweight at 25 pounds (the standard camera weighs 60).

For me, the whole experience was rounded off with the after-party, when I joined my Polartec PR chum with the movie’s director/producer David Breashears, Stephen Venables (first Brit to climb Everest without oxygen), and the movie’s two stars in a little visit to a nearby pub for a drink or two. I enjoyed a very pleasant chat with Jamling Norgay, and a cheeky dance with the charming Araceli Segarra!

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